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Music For Your Enjoyment

I just returned from a trip to New Orleans.  I attended the Gulf Coast Strategic Planning Conference, Assisting Animals in Need. I met a lot of wonderful people who care about animals and the world we live in. I realized, by the end of the weekend, just how connected we all are in the world.  This situation was manmade and will have consequences that are far reaching.  I see it as a wake-up call.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration(NOAA) had been invited to make a presentation at the conference. The Coordinator of NOAA’s “Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program” was going to attend.  The morning of the conference they pulled out and said they would not send a replacement. They would not say why the pulled out.

We did get to hear presentations from:

1.  Paul Berry, former CEO of Best Friends Animal Society.

2.  Beau Gast, LA Wildlife Rehabilitation Association and Clearwater Wildlife Sanctuary

3.  David Vitter, Louisiana Senator

4.  John Young, Chairman of Jefferson Parish Council   (He was awarded the “Pioneer Spirit Award”)

5. Billy Nungesser, President of Plaquemines Parish (He was awarded the “Pioneer Spirit Award”)

Donna Paige & Billy Nungesser

Billy Nungesser is a very generous man and cares about the public! I told him that I wanted to go out in the marshes and see what is going on, with my own eyes.  Billy called P.J. Hahn ( Director, Coastal Zone Management Dept.) who arranged for me to go out on the boat.  Billy told me that anyone else who attended the conference could join me.  We had about 15 people go out on Billy’s boats.

Two weeks ago Billy took Philippe Cousteau out on his boat so he could show Philippe the impact the oil has had. That trip will was taped and will be seen on National Geographic in October.   Jean-Michel Cousteau had interviewed Billy back in May. This issue is very important to Billy.  You can hear some of his thoughts by watching the video below.


I want to thank Joshua Lee for coming on the boat and being my photographer for the day.(www.Joshualeestudio.com)

The Crew on Billy's Boats

The Louisiana Crew

PJ Hahn & Jeff Dorson

Jeff Dorson, Executive Director for The Humane Society of Louisiana, said he was glad he was able to go out and see what is happening in the Gulf.  The very first thing we saw when we arrived at the dock was shocking! There was a very large area of land that was fenced in with a sign saying: “Warning, Do Not Enter, Hazardous Material”. PJ said that was the area where booms and equipment were housed.  He said it was so full that you could barely walk in there.  Had I arrived 6 days earlier I would have seen it myself.  Unfortunately, BP is taking everything out of the region and nothing was left, except a few booms.  (See below).

I did see tar balls floating in the water.  They are NOT gone.  I also saw oil slicks on top of that water.

Land for Housing booms and equipment

Once we pulled out of the dock we saw, immediately, how slack the care for this oil situation had become. Booms were not in place.  Many of the booms that were in place were covered in oil.  We also saw a number of BP workers on their boats but they were not doing any work. Here are a few pictures from the first canal we went down, the first 5 minutes of our day.

Dirty Booms

Missing Booms

Small Wake from Boat causes Water to go Above and Below Dirty Booms

Workers on Boats, NOT Working!

More Workers

The oil disaster has been a challenge in many ways.  Since the oil leak began, BP has been adding dispersants to the water.  The first 2 months they used Corexit 9527. There is proof that this product is harmful to animals and humans. After 20 years, the people affected by the Exxon disaster are still getting sick and cancer from the use of this dispersant. The past 2 months BP has been using Corexit 9500.  They say they don’t think it is as hazardous, but who wants to find out the hard way? I was naive about dispersants before my trip. I found out that it works like soap when you do your dishes.  It breaks down the oil over time by depleting the oxygen.  I have also had people contact me about “natural” options that can be used like the dispersants and the won’t harm animals or people.  I have a friend who is doing private testing of the water and dispersants. I hope the results will shed light on how damaging the product really is.   I am not sure anyone really knows what is safe, and will work, since nothing like this has ever happened before.  Most of the other products I had people tell me about sound good but have never been tested for something as large as this.  Using products in the Gulf of Mexico is not the same as testing them in a swimming pool.

Today I was informed that there are still 100 birds A DAY being treated for oil exposure. The media has us thinking that the worst is over.  From what I have seen, and heard, I think we have a long way to go.  PJ told me that he has seen a number of oiled birds that needed help ASAP!  PJ calls the 800 number that NOAA and Wildlife and Fisheries tell  you to call.  He said they ask you questions like:
1.  What restaurant are you close to?
2.  What are the cross streets?
He tells them he is in the middle of a marsh with an oiled bird and then he gets no response. If he can’t get an oiled bird helped, with all of his connections, how can we trust that this oil situation is being taken care of properly?

Pelicans

Pelicans on Cat Island, A National Wildlife Refuge

Pelicans on Cat Island

More Birds on Cat Island

There are reports that the oil has gone as far as 5,000 Ft. under the water. The concern, how this oil will impact the whole food chain. The seafood, (Ex: shrimp, crawfish, crabs)  live on the floor of the sea and eat plants/ dead creatures.  This seafood is the perfect meal for small fish.  The small fish are eaten by larger fish which can be eaten by whales, sharks, seals, etc.  Humans eat most of these creatures.  If the creatures at the bottom of the chain are impacted, everything and everyone can also be impacted.  The water all over the world is connected.  It’s the land that is not connected.  Once the water in Gulf begins to move, so will the oil that is still there.

If all of this alone were not bad enough……When I was out on the water I saw a number of flat boats and air boats deep in the marshes.  There is NO REASON for those boats to be there. When people do things like that they are destroying nests, babies, the marsh land itself not to mention spreading the oil around to other areas. The boats should stay on the outside of the booms.  I saw one area where these boats had been driving around.  The marsh area was completely flat and dead.  Because of this, the marsh land is being lost.

Marsh Land affected by the Boats

One of Several Boats in the Marsh

When I was growing up in New Orleans it really bothered me when I was told, “the coast is eroding away and the area I was fishing in would eventually be gone”.  Right now Louisiana is loosing 1 Football Field of land every 45 minutes. There are ways to restore the land AND protect the area from storms.  The challenge is that it takes about 6-8 years to get the approval from all of the authorities: EPA, Wildlife and Fisheries and NOAA.

I addition to these challenges, the families in the area are having a hard time making a living.   One night I went to to have dinner at a favorite seafood restaurant in the area.  I was surprised to see the place was nearly empty.  The owner told me that before the oil disaster you had to wait to get a table. Now, they are not sure how they will stay open.  They had to let a lot of their staff go.  Now the owners are the waiters, bus boys and run the business.  Katrina destroyed their restaurant, they rebuilt and opened 6 months ago.  People in the community were so happy to have the restaurant back in business.  Now they are not sure they will be able to stay open because people are afraid to eat the seafood. I had shrimp, oysters and soft shell crabs.  It was wonderful!

I saw firsthand how this crisis is affecting the people who live off the land (fishermen), the retailers (restaurants, markets), commercial real estate owners and attorney’s, etc.    I also heard a number of stories from people who can hardly feed themselves, much less their pets.  They had to take their loving animals to the pound. The shelters are so full that they can’t keep up with the demand. Many of these animals are losing their lives because they don’t have a place to live.  The Humane Society of Louisiana had to move their rescue from Louisiana to Mississippi after Katrina. The shelter was destroyed.  They have over 200 animals and only 6 workers.  It is a no kill shelter and they have so many people wanting to place animals with them. Mississippi was suppose to be a temporary location, until they could find new land and rebuild in Louisiana.  They still don’t have the funds to buy the land and build the shelter.

Two weeks ago I was going to have a fundraiser in Sarasota Florida.  I wanted to raise money to help the wildlife and other animals affected by the oil disaster and bring more awareness worldwide.  I had to postpone it.  Now that I have been home, in New Orleans, I think I might do the fundraiser there.

This situation has a far reaching affect on everyone, everywhere.  The first step is to find alternatives to oil.  The US consumes so much more than any other country in the world.  In addition, we import most of  it from other countries, like Canada.  It’s not like we are buying our own oil.  The world we live in is amazing!  This planet has been through so much and keeps on going.  It has the ability to regenerate itself, no matter what the human population does to it.  Unfortunately, regeneration takes a lot of time and it is being destroyed much faster than it can be repaired.  I hope this is a wake-up call and the world can learn from this situation.  Let’s take steps to improve the way we live.  Humans are so intelligent.  We are so advanced in medicine, technology, etc.  At the same time we seem to destroy things faster than we are advancing.

I was really glad I got to go to New Orleans.  I realize how much that place means to me.  It is one of the most unique, interesting, culture rich places you will ever visit.

You have to go visit and check it out yourself!!

Governor Jindal has declared August 20th Louisiana Wildlife Appreciation Day!

Here is a Copy of the Proclamation

As they say in Louisiana:  Laissex Les Bons Temps Rouler…..Let The Good Times Roll!!!


Please, post your comments, ideas, suggestions, etc. in the comment section below. I will be posting updates on the oil situation as I learn more.

Here are more pictures for you to see.
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Gini Hyman donated to our wildlife fund and won a weekend at Clear Creek Ranch in the beautiful North Carolina Mountains.  Thank you so much Gini!

I also want to thank all of the other wonderful people who donated to this cause. Even though the oil may have stopped spilling in the Gulf, the problem is far from over.  The chemicals used to get rid of the oil is having an impact on the wildlife, seafood, etc.  There is still a lot of oil in the swamps where these creatures live.  I am headed to New Orleans to see for myself.  I will do a special report when I return.  I will also post the pictures.

If you would like to help this cause, like Gini, please go to our homepage or click here.

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You could WIN 1 WEEKEND at Clear Creek Ranch in the North Carolina Mountains & HELP WILDLIFE.  There are so many creatures that are still dying from the oil that has been dispersed into the waters of the Gulf of Mexico.  There are so many political issues involved and it is impacting the lives of so much wildlife.

I am raising money for the wildlife.  Go to my HOMEPAGE and you will see the link “Wildlife Donations”.  If you donate, you have the potential to win a weekend at Clear Creek Ranch in the beautiful North Carolina Mountains. Please pass this on to the people in your database and social sites.

There will also be a conference in New Orleans Aug. 7th & 8th.  Details can be found on their website at www.humanela.org under their BP oil spill link.

The following agencies and departments will be providing speakers:
  • The US Coast Guard (will talk on their role as incident commander for this oil spill)
  • The Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (will talk on their role in helping marine mammals and sea turtles)
  • The Louisiana Dept of Wildlife and Fisheries (will talk on their role in capturing oiled birds)
  • local wildlife experts
  • British Petroleum (will talk on whatever they choose to share – they have been rather uncooperative (go figure!)
The first day of the conference will be divided into three sessions:
  • brief presentation by each speaker
  • panel discussion with answers taken from audience
  • strategy-building session facilitated by Paul Berry, former CEO of Best Friends Animal Sanctuary (audience will explore new ideas and more effective means of helping affective wildlife)
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Animal Connection will be hosting an event on August 1, 2010 to help the wildlife affected by the oil disaster.  It will be at the Hyatt Regency in Sarasota Florida from 5-9pm.  The fee to get in will be $20 donation.  Kristy and Lindsey Landers will provide their band for entertainment.  They play at all of the big parties for Hugh Hefner, PETA and other well know venues.  People who attend the event will have their name placed on the “wildlife” page of my website specifically for this event.  Even if you send in your donation, your name will be placed on the site.

Yesterday someone said my event is not only for the wildlife but everything and everyone.  They told me that the oil disaster affects the wildlife, impacts the seafood, the life of the fishermen and our economy as a whole.  I NEVER thought of it that way.  It is so true.  That is the exact reason for my show, Animal Connection…we are all connected in many ways.

We have had a number of celebrities and professional athletes express interest in attending the event or helping to promote the event.  I will have the names of the attendees in the next week.

This will be a wonderful event.  Please check back next week for more specific information.  We will also have a Paypal account set up so you can contribute if you would like.

I want to thank you again for your continued support of Animal Connection and the animals that don’t have a voice in this world.

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I have been very discouraged watching the news and reading articles about the oil disaster.  Every time I turn around I see, or hear, more negative.  My goal is to empower people, not bring them down. I have been making calls and doing research to find ways that people can help with the oil disaster. The information I get varies from source to source.  I got a call from Jeff Dorson today.  He is the Executive Director for the Humane Society of Louisiana.  He told me about a couple of groups that are actually qualified to help the wildlife in the Gulf.  Even though we have a long way to go, there are people who are able to make positive changes, if we help them.

I found out that there is so much red tape when it comes to helping these creatures. You need the proper training, an organization has been approved and the list goes on. Otherwise, you are not allowed to do anything with the animals.   In many ways that could be good.  We want to be sure the people dealing with these animals know what they are doing.  After all, this needs to improve the quality of life for the wildlife, not make it worse.  There are people who have had experience but don’t have the specific training needed to be approved for this mission.  Then there are those who are doing it for other reasons and it’s a good thing they are not allowed to be close to the wildlife.

Below are some wonderful organizations that could use your help.  You can give your time as a volunteer, send money or make calls/ send emails to officials that have the authority to make the changes needed.

1.  Operation Here to Help, is a joint effort launched by the Humane Society of Louisiana and Clearwater Wildlife Sanctuary to help wildlife adversely affected by the oil spill. Clearwater’s staff and volunteers are trained and certified wildlife rehabilitators who are working at the triage sites and administering direct aid to captured birds. They are providing logistical support by utilizing dozens of their volunteers who are transferring oiled birds directly from wildlife agents to the recovery centers. They’re also providing real-time information to state and federal agents by providing them with photos, notes, and coordinates. They are taking volunteers out on boats, contacting legislators, and more.

Operation Here to Help has staff and volunteers that have been out to the barrier islands in Barataria Bay, near Grand Isle, twice during the past several days. In the six total hours they spent surveying the area on boats, they spotted a mere three agents with nets with two large plastic dog carriers in the back of their boat. Meanwhile, they witnessed hundreds of oiled birds in distress. These trips made it clear to them that more aid is necessary to account for the significant number of birds currently in need of assistance.

That’s why they set up “Operation Here to Help”, a program of the Humane Society of Louisiana, with the goal of surveying the affected areas and providing coordinates to state and federal agencies. Although red tape still prevents them from handling oiled wildlife ourselves, They can provide critical information to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries so that they can most effectively mobilize their extremely limited manpower.

The facts are sobering. They were told by a wildlife agent that, for the entire Louisiana coastal area, there are a mere 100-150 officers licensed to rescue oiled wildlife, on shifts from 7:30 AM to 6:00 PM and they do not work at night. These are incredibly inadequate numbers. Additionally, most of the barrier islands, including Cat and Four Pass Bayou, which are rookeries and home to tens of thousands of water birds, have already been contaminated with oil.  The utilization of booms as buffers is extremely ineffective and dates back to the 1960’s. That is why their team wants to be “here to help” direct officers to areas where their work will have the most impact.

They have identified several ways that each of you can help them save more marine life and wildlife, whose lives hang in the balance. Their goal is to complement state and federal agencies in order to achieve the results they want. As one of Louisiana’s most dedicated humane organizations, they cannot sit back and let a handful of government workers and BP contractors respond with disgraceful inadequacy to the worst disaster in modern history to hit our precious wetlands. Here are their plans; they need your help to implement them:

Advocacy:

Call Robert Barham, Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife, and ask that he assign more agents to the capture of wildlife and ask him to ask for reinforcements from other states or other agencies if needed. Please use their reports from the front lines as evidence that much more help is needed. Call 1-225-765-2800.  Remember that there are between 100-150 agents out in the entire Gulf Coast assigned to wildlife capture. These numbers are not sufficient for the task at hand.  In the six hours they have spent surveying the areas on boats, they have only seen three agents with nets on one occasion. They had two large plastic dog carriers in the back of their boat, both empty.  At the same time, they also saw hundreds of birds in distress.

Information Gathering:

They will be going out in chartered boats during the next several months to obtain first-hand information and photographic evidence of the mistreatment of marine life.  If you would like to join them, please write an email to contact us at stopcruetly11@gmail.com.  Cost of trip per person: $60.00 for a three-hour trip. They are currently scheduling one to two trips a week, out of Venice and Grand Isle.

Information Sharing:

They will be hosting a two-day conference in New Orleans at the end of July. They intend to invite representatives from BP, the Coast Guard, the White House, members of Congress or their staff, social justice groups, animal protection and environmental groups to attend, speak, and listen to one another with the intention of developing and implementing short- and long-term goals. They will send out additional announcements during the next several weeks. They plan on visiting the coastline on the second day as a group.

Fund-raising

Funds are needed to keep their chartered boats in the water, to underwrite their upcoming conference, and to help mobilize volunteers from around the country. Please be as generous as possible. Each of you can help by donating through their PayPal account at: http://www.humanela.org/bpoilspill.htm.

65% of those proceeds from their website link will go to Clearwater Wildlife Sanctuary, whose staff and volunteers are caring for the wildlife. They have pledged to support them. The remaining 35% will go to the logistical support their group is providing. You can also send them a donation by mail to: The Humane Society of Louisiana at P.O. Box 740321, New Orleans, LA 7017

2. Nature Conservancy

We can’t afford to wait. The damage done by this spill demands that we ramp up our efforts as rapidly as possible.

They know we could be building 20 to 30 miles of reef a year, and promote hundreds of acres of seagrass and marsh recovery in the process. Within 3 to 5 years, they could complete 100 miles of oyster reef and at least 1,000 acres of seagrass and marsh habitat. That’s conservative — it’s possible, perhaps even likely, that a properly designed restoration could support 10,000 acres of seagrass and marsh.

Rebuilding such a system will have huge benefits beyond kick-starting the oil spill recovery:

  • If designed properly, oyster reefs will slow, and in many cases, halt the massive erosion that continues to carve into Alabama shorelines.
  • Reefs will help to filter the loose sediment that turns Mobile Bay a dark chocolate every time the wind blows.
  • Light-loving seagrasses return, tying down still more mud.
  • And in the quit eddies created by the reef, marshes will get a toe-hold and spread rapidly.

Best of all, re-creation of these reefs, seagrasses and marshes will result in an explosion of life. It won’t just be old timers who remember what it was like to go floundering in the seagrasses along the shores of Mobile Bay:

  • Harvest of white shrimp, once Mobile’s prized catch, will almost certainly rebound.
  • Crab habitat will increase dramatically.
  • Tens of thousands of young speckled trout, redfish, sheepshead and other Gulf game and food fish will once again find a place to grow and thrive.

To learn more about this endeavor, and how you can help, click here.

3. The National Wildlife Federation has been on the front lines responding to the wildlife crisis unfolding in the Gulf since the BP Oil Spill started on April 20.

Their Louisiana-based staff–already working on existing Coastal Louisiana restoration efforts before the spill–was deployed to help with the initial response. They have been joined by national staff, affiliates in the region and a growing network of volunteers.

They believe strongly they have an obligation to find out what is happening, share this information with the public and do everything they can to help wildlife survive this tragedy.

You can learn more about their “Search and Rescue”, how they are raising awareness and what they are saying on behalf of wildlife.  Click here.



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If you have dogs or ferrets, this is your lucky Friday. It has been a challenging week for me.  I have had a number of issues come up regarding dogs and ferrets.  I had to do some research and contact other rescues and shelters for help.  It’s amazing how animal people all stick together and help each other so animals can have a better life.  Thank you!!

One challenge I had were ferrets with fleas. I never had ferrets with fleas so I was not sure what to do about them.  I know they are delicate animals and it can be deadly if they are treated like dogs and cats for a flea problem. Here are some of the things I found out:

1. A flea condition is 100% fixable.  I spoke to rescues who told me that ferrets die from fleas. They are such small animals and it doesn’t take long for them to be sucked dry. The fleas are coming in from a source.  Once you find out what the source is, you can correct it.   Ferrets, being indoor animals, should not have fleas.

2. If you have dogs or cats that come in and out you can give them Capstar. You have to get it from a veterinarian.  This should not be given to ferrets, unless you just adopted them and need to get the fleas off this one time.  (Talk to your vet about dosage).

3. You can also get an 8oz. spray bottle.  Put about 2 tablespoons Skin-so-soft with 1 teaspoon alcohol (to cut the oil) and fill with water. You can spray that on the dogs and cats and rub it in.  This will kill fleas.  Again, be very careful not to use this too much with ferrets since they have very sensitive skin.

The one recommendation I got over and over again, get everyone and everything out of the house.  Fumigate the whole house and have the yard treated.  While you are gone, get all of the fleas off of all the animals.  When you return, you are starting new. Make sure all of the animals stay in the house.  If they must go outside, make sure they stay in your yard, if possible.  Give them Capstar before they go out to be sure they don’t get any fleas.  The ferrets should no longer have a flea problem, ever.

I also had people asking me about the proper food they should be feeding their dogs.  Since I have not had dogs in years, I was not sure what to tell them.  I have a friend, Greg Martinez, DVM who just wrote a book called, “Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet”.  That book has a wealth of information when it comes to feeding your dog. It gives you histories of different breeds, what different breeds eat, how different foods affect different dogs, etc.  Did you know dogs are not suppose to have any corn or beef?

Here are a few tidbits I got from the book that I thought were interesting and I wanted to pass along:

1. A Tablespoon of olive oil or canola oil on the food daily, or an egg yolk in the food three or four times a week, can have a wondrous effect on health.

2. Never give your dog chocolate.  That goes for ferrets too.  Ferrets should not have any sugars or fruit.

3. The closest ancestor to a dog, the wolf.   99.8% of a dog’s DNA matches the wolf. To feed dogs well on a diet that resembles the natural diet of a wolf, make sure the mix of ingredients and nutrients are similar.

4. Wild game provides the wolf with a high-water, low-carbohydrate diet that is also high in protein and fat.   With the exception of a few of the newer diet; canned dog foods most closely match the wolf’s natural diet.

5. Ounce for ounce, canned dog food has about a third the calories of dry food.

6. A healthier diet may actually prevent, decrease and often cure many of the common chronic problems in dogs.

These are the top 10 claims for Veterinary Pet Insurance:

A.Ear Infections

B. Skin Allerfies

C. Pyoderma (hotspots/ bacterial skin infections)

D. Gastritis/Vomiting (stomach upsets)

E.  Enteritis/Diarrhea

F.  Urinary Tract Infections Benign

G.  Skin Tumors

H.  Osteoarthritis

I.  Eye Inflammation

J.  Hypothyroidism

7. Allergies in dogs are caused by three common allergen groups:

A. Fleas

B.  Pollens, grasses and molds

C.  Allergenic food ingredients (most often wheat, beef and corn)

8.  Wolves keep their teeth clean by chewing on the bones of prey animals. In that tradition, you can give your dog raw or frozen chicken theighs, smoked pork bones or beef knucklebones, and they’ll gnaw the tartar away.  PLEASE, be careful what you give your dog. They should be able to chew NOT eat bones.  The book goes into detail about this.

To learn more about dogs and their diets click here for Dr. Greg’s Book.

Then I had questions about adopting dogs.  The best timing in the world because I had information sent to me from “The Camping Dog”.

It specifically talked about adopting a shelter dog. They say one of the best gifts you can give yourself is adopting a shelter dog.  Are shelter dogs right for everyone?  Absolutely not.  You never really know what you’ve got until you get your new friend home.  And odds are even that your dog will need specialized attention and care for health or behavior issues for some period of time.  Unless you’re willing to be patient and work with your pup, you have no business having a dog at all – and especially not a shelter dog who may well have had traumatic experiences.

There is nothing more rewarding than watching a dog blossom into their true personalities. Seeing a dog learn how to play for the first time is a delight.  And watching them grow as they learn new behaviors and have new experiences is so much fun!  And they do thank you for it in so many ways!

If you would like to know the questions to ask yourself if you are thinking about adopting a dog click here.

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Would you and your family like to really get away this summer?  How about becoming one with nature again, if you could sleep in a comfortable bed and take a nice hot shower?  There is a place like that in the North Carolina Mountains.  It is called Clear Creek Ranch. Nestled in a quiet valley in the Great Smoky Mountains at an elevation of 3,200 feet, Clear Creek Dude Ranch is surrounded by the beautiful Pisgah National Forest.  They welcome guests from April to Thanksgiving.  Some of the activities you will enjoy are horseback riding, camp fires, golf, fishing, hiking, swimming and many more.

It is owned by some wonderful friends of mine, Rex and Aileen Frederick. Rex was a great basketball star at Auburn University.  He became only the 3rd Auburn Tiger to have his jersey (#32) retired.  Rex is in the Auburn Hall of Fame.

Rex and his wife, Aileen, have always had a passion for animals, especially horses.  They decided to buy a dude ranch. It has been a wonderful experience for them but it is time for them to move on.  They are at that age where they want to travel and enjoy other things life has to offer.

They have been running this ranch 24/7 for many years.  It is not as easy, and glamorous, as you might think. Can you imagine having to get up at the crack of dawn to meet your guests as they arrive for breakfast every morning?  Then organize the activities, make sure everyone is having fun, oversee the business of the ranch, etc. At the end of the night making sure you are still awake to tell your guests, having a nightcap in the Cantina, good night before turning in?  Talk about a long day, everyday.  They have wonderful staff that come back year after year because of the way they are treated.  Even in the winter, when it is closed to the public, they need to care for all of the horses and other animals, as well as continue to run the ranch.

I hope you will visit Rex and Aileen before they sell this beautiful ranch.  If you go, tell them I said hi.  If you, or someone you know, has interest in buying this ranch, please let me know.   I’m selling the ranch for them.

Please enjoy this video of the ranch.


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I got this from one of my animal supporters:

Please take a moment on this memorial Day to honor all of those dogs, horses and all of the other animals who have passed on in combat while saving lives and all of those who were casualties of war.

“America’s war dogs prevented over 10,000 casualties in Vietnam alone and brav…ely served our country in Operation Desert Storm as well as WWII. Yet, many of these K9 soldiers were declared “surplus armaments” and were unceremoniously euthanized or left to unknown fates in Vietnam.

America’s war dogs were trained to recognize booby traps, mine tunnels and weapons caches. They were trained for parachute landings. They warned troops about ambushes. They saved lives by dragging wounded soldiers to safety. These K9 heroes lived, bonded and fought side-by-side with our veterans.”
Taken from War-Zone dogs.

Wishing you and your family a happy and safe memorial Day Weekend.

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Can anyone explain why the USDA will NOT step in and help the dogs and puppies in the mills? There has been so much evidence of mills abusing and neglecting these animals.  Many of these animals are dying horrible deaths.  Most people have heard about these atrocities.  The flip side, they go into a pet store to buy something for their animal. When they are there they see the poor puppy eyes looking at them.  At that very moment they feel they need to buy this puppy and give it a good home.  They forget where the puppy came from.   It is a vicious cycle.  I like what they have done in West Hollywood California.  The stores only sell puppies that come from shelters or rescues.  Click here to learn how you can do the same thing in your community.

This past week there was a report about the USDA failing to cut down on puppy mills.   They detail the horrific conditions and lax enforcement.  If you would like to read this article, click here.

There was also a show on Animal Planet that exposed Petland puppies. Since the airing of that show they have had so many people coming forward telling them stories about the health issues, and medical challenges, their puppies have had. In addition, the cost to care for these animals.

So many stories were sent in describing what it has been like for the owners of these puppies since they purchased their new family member.  The stories include Bailey, a Cairn terrier (pictured here), who became deathly ill and had to be hospitalized after she was purchased in Texas, and Little Red, who reportedly had the worst hip dysplasia her veterinarian had ever seen.

On the positive side, hopefully this show will get people to do more research on the stores and breeders of  puppies.  Even people in your community might have a small mill going and you don’t even know it.

If you would like to read more about this, or know of a puppy that you want to report because they have medical issues, click here.

Over the past few weeks I have had so many conversations regarding our world and where we are headed.  I have always said, “Humans are blessed with an exceptional brain.  We have made wonderful advances in technology, medicine, etc.  At the same time, we also seem to use it to destroy the world and harm innocent animals.  Right now we are harming and destroying at the same time (oil drilling, polluting the waters and killing all kinds of fish and wildlife).

I came up with the name of my show, “Animal Connection” because I know animals and humans are connected.  I never realized the timing of my show would be so perfect with the events going on in our society, in such an extreme way.  One major issue, once we destroy this earth that’s it.  No matter how much money anyone has, we can’t replace it!

The animals were here long before we were.  We should respect them and not use them for profit.  Someone said to me, “We should go back to the times of Little House on the Prairie”.  I’m starting to believe that’s not such a bad idea, although it was a very hard life!

I don’t know what the answer is.  We don’t seem to be able to get along and respect other humans (look at the wars).  How do we expect people to respect animals?

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I have had emails asking about the status of Buddy’s case from my post on January 9, 2010.  Buddy was  the German Shepherd dragged to death at the Colorado National Monument.  Steven Romero admitted his act and pled guilty to aggravated animal cruelty.  Sentencing is scheduled for July 30.

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